Tag: review

Review: White Is The Coldest Colour

Before I get started, I have to issue a couple of trigger warnings. Actually, no. I have to issue pretty much all of the trigger warnings. This book has a lot – domestic abuse, violence against women, violence against children, paedophilia and more. Even the language used to describe women and children is unsettling. Yet, I couldn’t put it down. And while the content is disturbing, there’s no excessively graphic depictions of violence.

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Review: Killman Creek

Gwen Proctor and her children are safe – for now – but Gwen knows it won’t last now that her serial killer psychopath ex is on the run and determined to find her. Gwen finds herself not knowing who she can trust, and tired of the constant hiding. Leaving her children with two of the only people she believes will be able to keep them safe, she decides to go on the offensive – finding Melvin Royal before he can hurt her or her kids.

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Review: The Maori Detective

What a ride The Maori Detective is! From the prologue to the final paragraph, this is one action-packed book. From gangs to blackmail and extortion to a vast foreign government conspiracy, the reader is kept on their toes.
Our protagonist, Carlos Wallace, is escaping his past in Australia and falls into a job as a Private Detective in Christchurch, New Zealand, a city recently ravaged by a devastating series of earthquakes.

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Review: Bonfire

So, I’m generally a skeptic when it comes to anybody crisscrossing into another career path. Musicians turning actor, actor turning musician and, apparently, actor turning author. But I am a big fan of Krysten Ritter, and it was one of the better picks for my Book of the Month club, so why not? Also, a caveat – this review may be refined and changed. I have a nasty dose of the flu (the joys of having a regular patient-zero in our home), so my brain is only fractionally functional!

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Review: The Wife Between Us

OK. Wow. This was a heck of a ride! We’re first introduced to who we assume to be our narrator – the spurned ex-wife, seemingly stalking her replacement. Then we’re sprung into the narration of Nellie, who we assume to be the replacement our first narrator is stalking. We are warned we shouldn’t make assumptions. And we should heed that warning. The beginning of The Wife Between Us, a collaboration between debut author Greer Hendricks and best-selling author, Sarah Pekkanen, starts off somewhat slow. You might call it a slow burn.

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Review: Lie To Me

Ugh! So many different and conflicting feels on this one! But, let’s start at the beginning, shall we? We’re first introduced to a random character, who assures us we are going to despise him/her. We are then taken to the scene of a grizzly murder. And then, finally, we’re introduced to Ethan Montclair, an author who wakes up one morning to find his wife has disappeared. She leaves him a note. “Don’t look for me”. At first, Ethan wants to abide by her wishes. Then he panics … and he calls a lawyer.

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Review: Nothing Bad Happens Here

First, let me say that I was eager to read this debut novel from New Zealand author, Nikki Crutchley. I loved that it wasn’t Americanized – the spelling, the terminology, all authentic. I’m fairly certain that after a nine-year absence from my home country, my accent got a little bit stronger thanks to this read! And boy – what a read it is …

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Review: Dead Stop

Sydney Parnell is a Railroad Cop and a Marine with an unhealthy dose of PTSD and even more guilt. She carries her ghosts with her, quite literally. Dead men she attended while assigned to Mortuary Affairs during the Iraq War, or men she killed herself, appear at the worse possible moments.

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Review: The Broken Girls

Told in two separate timelines, The Broken Girls first introduces us to four friends and classmates at the daunting Idlewild Hall, a school for unwanted and delinquent girls.  Set in 1950, we’re almost immediately thrown into a mystery, first with the omniscient ghost of Mary Hand, then the disappearance of one of the four friends.

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Review: Final Girls

Taking its cues from a slasher movie where only one person walks out alive at the end (think Halloween, Scream etc), Riley Sager takes us into the life of Quincy Carpenter, one of three girls dubbed a Final Girl by the press, the lone survivor of a horrific massacre while celebrating her best friend’s birthday at a cabin in the woods.  

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Review: Tresspassing

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